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I remain motivated by reminding myself that I am working to a better life for my family, humanity at large, and those entering the profession of veterinary medicine. 

The truth about chocolate is that it can be toxic, but dogs rarely ingest enough for it to be serious. If you catch your dog eating something it shouldn’t, always take note of what they ate, how much, and when.

So, you think you’re ready to be a pet owner? You’ve done your research and are ready to take the plunge. However, there’s more to pet ownership than providing a home and basic necessities.

From companionship to emotional support, pets play a vital role in our everyday lives. And while it may be difficult to distinguish between normal and abnormal behaviors, it is important to pay close attention to potential warning signs that your pet may require medical assistance.

A 2019 survey conducted by the American Pet Products Association (APPA) found that about 67 percent of U.S. households now have at least one pet. This represents a 56 percent increase from 1988, and there is no slowdown in sight. 

“I started as an overnight technician in a small hospital in Seattle, although I have always loved animals. After discovering that I enjoyed the work very much, I applied to veterinary school at Washington State University and graduated in 1996.”

Dr. Anthony S. Johnson has been working in the veterinary profession for over twenty-five years. In his time as a vet, nothing has changed the way he works quite like the COVID-19 pandemic. Offices are closed or working in totally new ways, people are home and spending more time with their pets, and a business focused on customer service and animal welfare is now required to respect social distancing orders. These changes have been an adjustment, not only for vets and those who work with them, but for pet owners, too.

Many of us consider our pet cats and dogs so much a part of the family that we share everything from couch space to kitchen space. It seems the spaces we share may harbor bacteria hazardous to our health.

Chewing — it’s what dogs do. And rawhides are classic chew toys for dogs. Made from the inner layer of cowhides that are cleaned, cut, shaped, sometimes flavored and then dried, rawhides can give dogs hours of …

Taking a pet to the emergency hospital is something none of us wants to do. It’s scary and stressful for you and your dog or cat. We’ve been there more times than we like to think about, and we …

THE HOLIDAY season is one of togetherness, and pets are increasingly a big part of the holiday festivities. During this otherwise joyous season, a few pet dangers are lurking, though. This info will help keep your pet safe during …

Thank you for reaching out to us. Know that we are here for both you & your dog during this time of need. We know that these times are uncertain so we have compiled a series of common …

Most of my interactions with pet owners end with something like “Nice to meet you, thanks for helping Fluffy, and I hope I never see you again.” Not because I lack social skills or have a crummy bedside manner (I hope not, anyway), but because emergency room visits …

Just like some humans, many dogs have lactose intolerance. But even if your dog is okay with milk, it’s not a good idea to give him a lot of sugar.

There’s a controversy in veterinary medicine that divides the profession, and it’s over something that many pet owners never give a second thought: kissing your pets. As you might …

A woman in Wisconsin recently found her lost wedding ring, which had been missing for five years. She found it when her dog, Tucker, vomited it up. (And no, he’s not a Lab!)

Taking a pet to the emergency hospital is something none of us wants to do. It’s scary and stressful for you and your dog or cat. We’ve been there more times than we like to think about, and we have some tips to help you cope. We hope you won’t ever need to use them, but …

In order to protect staff, patients, and animal owners from the novel coronavirus, many veterinary clinics and emergency centers are limiting in-person assessments to critical cases only. 

According to the VIN Foundation, the average cost of four years of veterinary school in the U.S. is around $200,000 for in-state students, and $275,000 for out-of-state students. Not surprisingly, most new veterinarians start their career saddled with severe debt that can take decades to eliminate.